70 medtech firms sign PSMF’s Open Data Pledge

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Seventy healthcare technology companies have signed the Patient Safety Movement Foundation’s (PSMF) Open Data Pledge to improve patient safety.

The organization, which works with all stakeholders in the industry to address the problems around patient safety, said these companies would allow access to the data generated by their medical devices for researchers and entrepreneurs that seek to improve patient monitoring and care.

By sharing data from their products, in accordance with applicable patient privacy laws, these companies help further the development of predictive algorithms that can notify clinicians and patients of dangerous trends and thus enable earlier interventions.

“Predictive algorithms will be key in rapidly eliminating preventable patient deaths,” said Joe Kiani, PSMF Founder. “These companies understand the urgency in what needs to be achieved and are leading the way in creating the patient data superhighway that will help us reach zero patient deaths by the year 2020.”

PSMF encourages healthcare technology companies to share the data that their products are purchased for. They do so without disclosing any proprietary algorithms or protected data, subject to applicable patient privacy laws.

Recently, 25 hospitals in Mexico also signed the commitment to implement processes to eliminate preventable patient deaths.

Mexico’s Academy of Surgery, the Federation of Anesthesiologists and College of Health Quality Professionals of the West, Guadalajara, and Jalisco have also joined the Patient Safety Movement Foundation (PSMF) as committed partners.

By signing the commitment, the hospitals agree to implement processes such as the Actionable Patient Safety Solutions (APSS) designed to help eliminate preventable patient deaths in hospitals.

“Patient safety in hospitals is a global concern, and we hope all countries will join us,” said Kiani.

The movement started in the United States but its vision for protecting patient lives has alway been global. Kin said the commitments now represent 33 hospitals and three healthcare organizations in Mexico.

“This is just the beginning for Mexico and we need every hospital to participate if we want to eliminate medical errors and preventable deaths,” Dr. Javier Dávila Torres, PSMF Regional Chairman for Mexico and Former Medical Director of the Social Security Mexican Institute. 

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